A key factor concerns how long you want to keep the instrument: Is it for a beginner, especially a youngster, and you're not sure piano lessons will "stick"? Is it a stepping stone to a better piano later on? Then an inexpensive piano may do. Do you want this to be the last piano you'll ever buy? Then, even if your playing doesn't yet justify it, buy a piano you can grow into but never grow out of.

A note about how long a piano will last—a question I hear every day. The answer varies for pianos almost as much as it does for people. A piano played 16 hours a day in a school practice room might be "dead" in ten years or less, whereas one pampered in a living room in a mild climate might last nearly a century before requiring complete restoration to function again. A rule-of-thumb answer typically given is that an average piano under average conditions will last 40 to 50 years. If past experience is any guide, it would not be unreasonable to predict that the best-made pianos will last about twice as long as entry-level ones, given similar conditions of use and climate. However—and this is the important point—most pianos are discarded not because they no longer function—in fact, they may go on to long lives as used pianos for other people—but because they no longer meet the needs or expectations of their owners or players. A player may have musically advanced beyond what the instrument will deliver, or the owner may now be wealthier and have higher expectations for everything he or she buys—or perhaps no one in the house is playing anymore and the piano is just taking up space. Thus, the important consideration for most buyers, especially buyers of new or relatively young pianos, is how long the piano in question will meet their needs and expectations, rather than how long that piano will last.

You'll get a better sense of what quality means in a piano if you play a wide variety of them, including ones that cost less than what you plan to spend, as well as ones you can't afford. Warning: The latter can prove dangerous to your bank account. It's not unusual for a buyer to begin shopping with the intention of buying a $3,000 vertical, only to emerge some time later with a $30,000 grand!

New or Used?

The next choice you'll have to make is whether to buy new or used. The market for used pianos is several times the size of the market for new ones. Let's look at the merits of each choice:

New Piano Advantages

  • Manufacturer's warranty
  • Little chance of hidden defects
  • Lower maintenance costs
  • Easier to shop for
  • Usually more local choices
  • Longer piano life expectancy
  • Greater peace of mind after purchasing

New Piano Disadvantages

  • Higher upfront cost
  • Significant depreciation loss if resold within first few years
  • Limited choice of attractive old styles and finishes

Used Piano Advantages

  • Lower upfront cost
  • Greater choice of attractive old styles and finishes
  • Can be more fun and interesting to shop for (if you like shopping for old things)
  • Restorer may detail instrument to an extent that rivals new piano
  • Piano likely to be already sig-nificantly depreciated, resulting in little or no loss if resold

Used Piano Disadvantages

  • No manufacturer's warranty (though there may be a dealer's or restorer's warranty)
  • Greater chance of hidden defects (unless completely restored)
  • Higher maintenance costs (unless completely restored)
  • Shorter piano life expectancy (unless completely restored)
  • Can be maddeningly difficult and confusing to shop for
  • Need to pay technician to examine and appraise it
  • Usually fewer local choices
  • Possible need to size up restorer's ability to do a good job

 

SPRING 2010 -- page 22

Piano Buyer Home

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Acoustic Pianos

Digital Pianos

Hybrid & Player Pianos

New-Piano Buyers’ Reference

ACOUSTIC PIANOS

DIGITAL PIANOS